Apple Music vs iTunes Match: What's the difference?

Confused about what you get with Apple Music versus what you get with iTunes Match?

With the arrival of Apple Music—and its broad claim to make your library’s songs streamable alongside its primary streaming collection—those with iTunes Match accounts might be a wee bit confused as to whether they still need the service. Here’s what you need to know!

What Apple Music offers

For $9.99/month (or $14.99/month, for a family plan), Apple Music gives you access to its streaming catalog and a whole other host of cool music features. In addition, Apple Music subscribers can stream any song in the Apple Music catalog, whether they own it or not; they can also upload up to 25,000 songs from their iTunes Library that Apple doesn’t have the rights to.

Those songs go into your iCloud Music Library, where they can be streamed at any time. (Your iCloud Music Library doesn’t count toward your iCloud storage, as your Photo Library does; it’s only based on number of songs, rather than gigabytes.)

What iTunes Match offers

For $25/year, Apple will let you stream up to 25,000 songs from your iTunes Music library to up to 10 devices (including up to 5 computers) connected to your Apple ID.

If Apple has the rights to any of your songs, they won’t count toward your 25,000 limit; only songs Apple uploads from your iTunes Library count. i.e.: Taylor Swift’s 1989 will stream without being uploaded; your demo recordings will need to be uploaded to Apple’s servers first.

Do you need both?

Nope. One or the other will accomplish the same basic point.

So Apple Music basically duplicates iTunes Match, right? Why is it useful, then?

Apple Music only duplicates iTunes Match if you’re a paid subscriber. If you’re not, you’ll still need iTunes Match to store your music library in iCloud.

Why would you choose iTunes Match rather than just subscribe to Apple Music? Math, my friends: iTunes Match is just $24.99/year, while an Apple Music subscription runs you $119.98/year. If streaming all of Apple’s music collection doesn’t appeal to you, but having on-the-go access to your full music library does, iTunes Match appears to be a good alternate option.

What happens when you cancel?

Here’s where there’s a difference: When you cancel an Apple Music subscription, you lose access to your iCloud Music Library along with any streaming songs you may have added to it that you didn’t own.

When you cancel an iTunes Match subscription, however, the cloud library remains but you won’t be able to add any new purchases or songs to it.

Other questions?

Any other questions about iTunes Match vs Apple Music? Sound off in the comments.

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Source: iMore

About Bhavesh Rabari

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